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Published: Tuesday, July 3, 2012, 9:50 p.m.

Man suspected of attack had long criminal history

PORTLAND, Ore. -- The man accused of stabbing a 10-year-old in a fast food bathroom spent a tumultuous eight years in and out of jail since his release from prison in 2004.
Adam Lee Brown was sentenced to 15 years in prison after a notorious series of assaults in Roseburg in the early 1990s involving children. He was released after 11 years.
There began a series of criminal incidents, major and minor, that culminated in a disturbing pattern of behavior.
The behavior was reviewed by the Oregon Board of Parole and Post-Prison Supervision, but because Brown was on post-prison supervision, the board lacked the authority to return him to prison.
"The parole board has no authority to return him to prison for any reason," said board member Jeremiah Stromberg. "It would require a new conviction that requires a prison sentence. Violations of supervision with the resources we have is limited to local jail incarceration."
Brown was released to Douglas County's probation system in 2004. In January 2011, he moved to Multnomah County and was put under its supervision.
Multnomah County Probation, Parole and Post-Prison Supervision spokesman Henry Stern said the county's records on Brown are part of an investigation and not public record.
Brown pleaded not guilty to Sunday's attack. The boy he is accused of stabbing was released from the hospital Tuesday.
"You cannot begin to imagine the horror we have been through in the past couple of days," the unidentified boy's family said in a plea for privacy released Tuesday night through Portland police. "Our son is going through a lot and we as a family are committed to letting our little boy heal in peace."
The HIV-positive son of a church pastor, Brown was convicted in 1993 of three counts of first-degree sodomy, each involving a child. He pleaded no contest to reduced charges -- the initial charges included attempted murder because of his HIV.
At least nine children in the small logging town of Roseburg told police that Brown molested them.
He was in prison from 1993-2004, earning three years off his 15-year sentence through accrued earned time. Less than one year after his release, Brown spent 75 days in jail for having contact with a minor.
A Douglas County sheriff's deputy said in 2005 Brown approached two girls, ages 8 and 9, on the way home from school and told one, "You're pretty."
The girls ran. When questioned, Brown didn't deny the contact.
By 2007, Brown was kicked out of a halfway house and was only occasionally taking his psychiatric medication, according to state parole board documents. An automated score generated by parole officials assigned Brown a risk score of 2, relatively low.
By 2009, that risk score was increased to 4, and Brown again faced a jail sentence, this time 90 days, for a host of infractions, from marijuana use to associating with people under 18 and furnishing alcohol to people under the legal drinking age.
His probation officer described her concern.
"It is of great concern that although Mr. Brown is engaging in sexual relations with persons over 18 that he is providing alcohol to these persons," wrote the officer, Tesa Mann. "I have great concerns regarding his behavior and believe these behaviors put the community at great risk."
By 2010, his offender risk score was at 8. He went into a bar -- forbidden by the terms of his supervision -- and spent almost one month in jail.
He then moved to Multnomah County. His supervision officer, Tracey Madsen, expressed concerns about his behavior. He was lying, she said, and gambling away his Social Security check on video poker. Madsen said she found pornography, another violation of his supervised release. He spent another month in jail.
His most recent jail stint, from Jan. 15 to April 13 of this year, came after a host of charges, including first-degree burglary. Brown entered a Portland U.S. Veteran's Affairs clinic and grew irate when he was asked to leave the facility for being disruptive.
Police and Brown's parole officer believe he then hid in a bathroom at the clinic and waited until staff left, then trashed the area and his case manager's office. Police found a duffel bag Brown brought with him in the clinic, along with medical papers with his name on them.
When he was arrested on Jan. 15, Brown demanded his arresting officer deliver a message to Madsen, which Madsen said the officer took down verbatim. The expletive-filled rant ends with, "You will never see me again except possibly in the media."

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