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Published: Monday, August 20, 2012, 12:01 a.m.

Photojournalist's new book recounts 34-year career

  • Barry Sweet was an Associated Press photographer based in Seattle for 34 years.

    Raleigh Sweet

    Barry Sweet was an Associated Press photographer based in Seattle for 34 years.

  • Barry Sweet photographed baseball Hall of Famer Earl Averill at his Everett home. Averill, who was born in Snohomish, played centerfield for Cleveland...

    Barry Sweet / Associated Press

    Barry Sweet photographed baseball Hall of Famer Earl Averill at his Everett home. Averill, who was born in Snohomish, played centerfield for Cleveland and was elected to the hall in 1975. He died in Everett in 1983.

  • ■─˙Split Seconds■─¨ by AP photographer Barry Sweet.

    ■─˙Split Seconds■─¨ by AP photographer Barry Sweet.

Barry Sweet, an Associated Press photographer in Seattle for 34 years, was always there: There for the splashdown of Apollo 8, the first Americans to orbit the moon in 1968; there when Robert Kennedy made a campaign trip to Oregon weeks before his assassination; there for Jimi Hendrix's funeral in Renton and for Madonna's first-ever concert in Seattle.
Sweet has come out with a collection of his news photography, "Split Seconds: Four Decades of News Photography from the Pacific Northwest and Beyond," and he will be signing copies of the book from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday at the Everett Costco, 10200 19th Ave. SE.
The book, which lists at $19.95, is a visual history with behind-the-scenes accounts of major news-making events.
Of the splashdown of Apollo 8, Sweet writes: "NASA didn't want the press too close to the splashdown site, in case they opened the capsule door and found the men dead. We had to stay on a nearby Navy ship, so I bought cameras from the ship store and gave them to the military helicopter crew that would fly the astronauts back to the ship. I told the crew if they took pictures and gave me the film, I'd let them keep the cameras."
Sweet had easy access to the headline makers of the day: "There were no security agents or squads of policemen getting between us and our subjects. (Former pro football player) Rosey Grier was Robert Kennedy's only protection. I remember Kennedy was always asking us what time it was. He couldn't wear a watch because people would try to take it off his wrist," he writes.

Story tags » PhotographyBooks

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