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Published: Tuesday, January 1, 2013, 12:01 a.m.

Kids learn art of making mummies

Imagine Children's Museum class focuses on the life and death of pharaohs

  • Jacob Rosen (left), 8, Camryn Joy, 6, Hayden Joy, 9, and Karen Setterberg, 8, work together to decipher a phrase written in hieroglyphics during the T...

    Genna Martin / The Herald

    Jacob Rosen (left), 8, Camryn Joy, 6, Hayden Joy, 9, and Karen Setterberg, 8, work together to decipher a phrase written in hieroglyphics during the The Case of Frozen Time day camp at the Imagine Children's Museum in Everett. The campers enjoyed activities focused on ancient Egypt and mummies.

  • Karen Setterberg (left), 8, Jacob Rosen, 8, Hayden Joy, 9, Ray Johnson, 8, and Camryn Joy, 6, learn to spell their own names using hieroglyphics durin...

    Genna Martin / The Herald

    Karen Setterberg (left), 8, Jacob Rosen, 8, Hayden Joy, 9, Ray Johnson, 8, and Camryn Joy, 6, learn to spell their own names using hieroglyphics during the The Case of Frozen Time day camp at the Imagine Children's Museum in Everett. The kids enjoyed activities focused on ancient Egypt and mummies.

  • Claire McCullough, 7, translates her name into hieroglyphics during the The Case of Frozen Time day camp at the Imagine Children's Museum in Everett. ...

    Genna Martin / The Herald

    Claire McCullough, 7, translates her name into hieroglyphics during the The Case of Frozen Time day camp at the Imagine Children's Museum in Everett. The campers enjoyed activities focused on ancient Egypt and mummies.

  • Ray Johnson (left), 8, and Hayden Joy, 8, compare apples that they will make into "mummies," by dehydrating them with a mixture of washing soda, bakin...

    Genna Martin / The Herald

    Ray Johnson (left), 8, and Hayden Joy, 8, compare apples that they will make into "mummies," by dehydrating them with a mixture of washing soda, baking soda and salt, at the The Case of Frozen Time day camp at Imagine Children's Museum in Everett. The campers enjoyed several activities focused on ancient Egypt.

  • Kids carved apples into "mummies" and then dehydrated them using a mixture of washing soda, baking soda, and salt.

    Genna Martin / The Herald

    Kids carved apples into "mummies" and then dehydrated them using a mixture of washing soda, baking soda, and salt.

EVERETT -- Camryn Joy used a popsicle stick to carve out pieces of an apple.
The 6-year-old made a face and ears in the piece of fruit she'd named Queen Tut. Then she stuck the stick in the top of the apple and rolled her creation in a bag containing salt, baking soda and other ingredients.
"It's gross stuff," Camryn said.
She was one of 11 kids who Thursday afternoon were part of The Case of Frozen Time, an Imagine Children's Museum day camp focusing on mummies. The mixture in the children's bags would help dehydrate their apples, or mummify them over time, said Tanya Feldman, a museum educator.
"It will shrink over time and all the juice will be removed," she said. "Then you'll end up with a small apple head."
Imagine Children's Museum hosts different camps throughout the year for kids to learn at and have fun, Feldman said. It was the first time the museum has hosted the camp about mummies.
She'd never mummified an apple, said Natalie McCullough, 7, but she told her classmates that she has read books about ancient Egypt.
"They would bury pharaohs when they died," she said. "They would take some valuable things with them to the afterlife."
Before making the apple mummies, Feldman also taught her class about hieroglyphics. The children decoded two messages and learned about Amenhotep III, an Egyptian pharaoh. When a pharaoh like Amenhotep or other important people died, the ancient Egyptians used to remove most of the dead person's organs, including the brain, Feldman said. Those organs were then preserved inside of canopic jars that were buried with the mummy.
Feldman told her students that they would turn empty plastic soda bottles into jars that would include their own secret messages.
During that art project, Madeline Harrington, 10, wrapped her bottle in masking tape and wrote her message in hieroglyphic code with a purple marker.
"It says, 'I was from 2012 and I live in this bottle,'" she said.
Writing and decoding messages was his favorite project, said Ray Johnson, 8.
"You get a whole new way of writing," he said.
Being part of the camp made it a fun day, added Claire McCullough, 7.
"I liked being with friends," she said.

Amy Daybert: 425-339-3491; adaybert@heraldnet.com.



Story tags » Imagine Children's Museum

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