The Herald of Everett, Washington
HeraldNet on Facebook HeraldNet on Twitter HeraldNet RSS feeds HeraldNet Pinterest HeraldNet Google Plus HeraldNet Youtube
HeraldNet Newsletters  Newsletters: Sign up | Manage  Green editions icon Green editions

Calendar

Splash! Summer guide

HeraldNet Headlines
HeraldNet Newsletter Delivered to your inbox each week.
Published: Friday, February 22, 2013, 11:02 a.m.

Deadly snow snarls Midwest traffic

  • Josh Buschbom shovels out his truck bed in Des Moines, Iowa, on Friday.

    AP

    Josh Buschbom shovels out his truck bed in Des Moines, Iowa, on Friday.

MINNEAPOLIS — Gusty winds and iced-over roadways made for treacherous Midwest travel Friday as a major winter storm headed east over the Great Lakes.
Two deaths have been linked to the storm, including one in a fatal traffic accident in Minnesota. Accidents and slide-offs were widespread across the affected states. Commuters faced strong winds of Lake Michigan in eastern Wisconsin. While Chicago's large fleet of snowplows salted and cleared the city's streets of 3 inches of snow, commuters slogged through slush to get to their offices.
About 270 flights in and out of Chicago's two airports were canceled Friday morning. Arrival delays of up to 90 minutes were reported at O'Hare airport. The Kansas City and St. Louis, Mo., airports both reopened Friday morning but had numerous cancellations and delays.
The snow began falling in Detroit just in time for the morning rush, turning streets and freeways into a mess.
Head bowed and arms crossed, 45-year-old Patrice Denham pushed forward into Detroit's swirling snow. She had just walked several blocks to her townhouse complex's leasing office for a new mailbox key and was heading back home.
"You live in the city of Detroit and you do what you have to do," Denham said referring to the rough winter weather that regularly affects the city. "If it's going to be cold, it's going to be cold. But this has been only an average winter."
Where the storm struck hardest Wednesday and Thursday, impressive snow totals rolled in — 17 inches in Hays, Kan.; 13 inches in northern Oklahoma; 13 ½ inches in northeast Missouri and south-central Nebraska; and 12 inches in parts of Kansas City, Mo.
As it moved farther north and east overnight and into Friday, the system lost strength. Illinois' totals ranged from 7.5 inches in the west-central town of Rushville to a mix of sleet and freezing rain in the St. Louis, Mo., suburbs. Dodge County in southeastern Minnesota received 8 inches by Friday morning, and Trempealeau County of western Wisconsin had 7 inches.
Students across a large swath of Kansas spent a second day at home as crews continue to excavate residential neighborhoods. Schools also were closed Friday in parts of Missouri, Michigan, Wisconsin and Minnesota.
The Kansas Legislature was back in session Friday after canceling its meetings Thursday, but lawmakers' schedule was light.
Travel continued to be the major issue Friday.
A United plane slid off a slick runway at the Cleveland airport onto a grassy area Friday morning. No injuries were reported.
The Minnesota State Patrol blamed the snow for over 200 accidents during the Friday morning commute. One driver was killed when a vehicle lost control, slid into oncoming traffic and was broadsided on a highway in the St. Paul suburb of Eagan.
A death in western Iowa was also linked to the storm when a woman was run over Thursday by her car, which had gotten stuck on her steep, slippery driveway.
Also in Iowa, a bus carrying members of a college softball team was involved in a multi-vehicle crash Friday morning. It closed part of Interstate 80 east of Des Moines, and no serious injuries were reported.
In some locations, the storm didn't live up to the hype. At the Pilot Flying J station near Interstate 29 in southwest Iowa, shift manager Kelly Malone said Friday his company had taken precautions by reserving seven rooms for employees at the nearby Super 8 Motel.
"We were prepared for the worst, but it didn't happen that bad," he said. Iowa's snow totals topped out at 9.7 inches near Sioux City.
"To me it was just an average storm, but I'm a person who drives through anything," he said.
Story tags » Snow

Share your comments: Log in using your HeraldNet account or your Facebook, Twitter or Disqus profile. Comments that violate the rules are subject to removal. Please see our terms of use. Please note that you must verify your email address for your comments to appear.

You are logged in using your HeraldNet ID. Click here to update your profile. | Log out.

Our new comment system is not supported in IE 7. Please upgrade your browser here.

comments powered by Disqus
digital subscription promo

Subscribe now

Unlimited digital access starting at 99 cents, or included with any print subscription.

HeraldNet highlights

Bad behavior
Bad behavior: Start of crab season brings out the worst in some
Longer, farther
Longer, farther: Air New Zealand gets first stretched 787
From seed to store
From seed to store: Photo essay: Follow marijuana from the grower to the seller
Summer spirits
Summer spirits: Four refreshing drinks for hot days, suggested by local experts