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Published: Saturday, June 1, 2013, 12:01 a.m.

Everett students reclaim wetland once filled with trash

South Everett elementary students adopt a once-trash-filled wetland

  • Miguel Hernandez, 10, a fourth-grader at Horizon Elementary in Everett, pulls out the roots of the creeping buttercup with a grub tool in wetlands nex...

    Photo courtesy of Kelly Sprute, U.S. Forest Servic

    Miguel Hernandez, 10, a fourth-grader at Horizon Elementary in Everett, pulls out the roots of the creeping buttercup with a grub tool in wetlands next to the school.

  • Ireland Coons, 8, a third-grader at Horizon Elementary in Everett, uses a trowel to get to Himalayan blackberry roots in wetlands next to the school.

    Photo courtesy of Kelly Sprute, U.S. Forest Servic

    Ireland Coons, 8, a third-grader at Horizon Elementary in Everett, uses a trowel to get to Himalayan blackberry roots in wetlands next to the school.

They pulled up invasive buttercups and blackberry vines and spread mulch under the trees.
On Friday, students at Horizon Elementary School on Casino Road in south Everett enthusiastically welcomed U.S. Forest Service and EarthCorps members, who helped the kids continue their ongoing quest to preserve the forest wetlands adjacent to the school yard.
The third-, fourth- and fifth-grade students learned about wetland ecosystems while they performed stewardship activities.
Fifth-grade teacher Jennifer Caione said her students like seeing their wetlands become a place to enjoy.
"My students formed an assembly line and laid mulch under 40 trees," Caione said. "There aren't a lot of trees on Casino Road and the wetlands used to be full of garbage. So the kids love to see the progress they have made and know they are helping the wetlands and the forest. They want to put in more trails and an amphitheater where we can hold class outdoors."
Story tags » Horizon ElementaryNature

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