BIG TICKET GIVEAWAY

Win 2 tickets to every event for a year! Click here to enter.

Present by The Daily Herald
The Herald of Everett, Washington
HeraldNet on Facebook HeraldNet on Twitter HeraldNet RSS feeds HeraldNet Pinterest HeraldNet Google Plus HeraldNet Youtube
HeraldNet Newsletters  Newsletters: Sign up | Manage  Green editions icon Green editions

Calendar


HeraldNet Headlines
HeraldNet Newsletter Delivered to your inbox each week.
Published: Monday, June 24, 2013, 12:01 a.m.

County aims to snuff out knotweed in waterways

EVERETT -- A program getting under way this summer aims to eradicate invasive Japanese knotweed from the banks of the Pilchuck River.
Snohomish County's Noxious Weed Control Board plans to perform the work with the help from state and federal grants. The goal is to start near the river's headwaters near Spada Lake, then move south past Granite Falls, Lake Stevens and Snohomish, until reaching the Snohomish River.
"If you live or own property on the Pilchuck River or any of its tributaries, if you have seen this plant, or if you would like to schedule a field visit, contact us," said Sonny Gohrman, the county's noxious weed coordinator.
From now until September, the noxious weed board will be seeking river access to survey and control the invasive plant, at no cost to landowners.
The county's noxious weed board received a $20,000 state Department of Agriculture grant for surveying, Gohrman said. Another state grant for the same amount is expected next month. An additional $10,000 in county Surface Water Management dollars is dedicated for knotweed removal in the Stillaguamish River, Little Bear Creek and Pilchuck River basins as needed.
The state Department of Ecology also is providing a Conservation Corps crew for some of the surveying and removal work.
Knotweed sprouts from stems and roots. It can clog small waterways and displace native vegetation. That can lead to bank erosion, flooding, and destruction of fish and wildlife habitat.
Japanese knotweed and related plants are native to Asia. They were introduced to the United States in the late 1800s as ornamentals. Common names include Mexican or Japanese bamboo, elephant ear and fleeceflower.
For more information, or to schedule a visit, call 425-388-7534; or write to Janice Martin, the county's noxious weed inspector, at janice.martin@snoco.org; or to Gohrman at sonny.gohrman@snoco.org.
Story tags » Granite FallsLake StevensSnohomishPilchuck River

Share your comments: Log in using your HeraldNet account or your Facebook, Twitter or Disqus profile. Comments that violate the rules are subject to removal. Please see our terms of use. Please note that you must verify your email address for your comments to appear.

You are logged in using your HeraldNet ID. Click here to update your profile. | Log out.

Our new comment system is not supported in IE 7. Please upgrade your browser here.

comments powered by Disqus

HeraldNet highlights

This is arena food?
This is arena food?: Xfinity rolls out shiny new menu for Tips games, other events
Big-top dreams
Big-top dreams: Young ringmaster followed his heart to the circus tent
'Maze Runner' gets lost
'Maze Runner' gets lost: Film has its moments, but seems overly familiar
All the right notes
All the right notes: 5th Avenue Theatre's 'A Chorus Line' feels fresh