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Published: Monday, July 22, 2013, 11:28 a.m.

Dennis Farina, star of 'Law & Order,' dead at 69

  • This 2004 photo shows actor Dennis Farina in character as Police Detective Joe Fontana on NBC's "Law & Order."

    NBC

    This 2004 photo shows actor Dennis Farina in character as Police Detective Joe Fontana on NBC's "Law & Order."

NEW YORK -- Dennis Farina, a onetime Chicago cop who as a popular actor played a cop on "Law & Order," has died.
Farina died Monday morning in a Scottsdale, Ariz., hospital after suffering a blood clot in his lung, according to his publicist, Lori De Waal. He was 69.
For three decades, Farina was a character actor who displayed remarkable dexterity, charm and, when called for, toughness, making effective use of his craggy face, steel-gray hair, ivory smile and ample mustache.
Farina appeared in films including "Get Shorty," "Saving Private Ryan," "Midnight Run" and "Out Of Sight."
Among his many TV portrayals was Detective Joe Fontana on "Law & Order" during the 2004-06 seasons. He starred in the 1980s cult favorite "Crime Story" and was a regular in the 2011-12 HBO drama "Luck."
He recently completed shooting a comedy, "Lucky Stiff."
A veteran of the Chicago theater, Farina appeared in Joseph Mantegna's "Bleacher Bums" and "Streamers," directed by Terry Kinney, among other productions.
Born Feb. 29, 1944, in Chicago, he was a city detective before he found his way into the acting profession as he neared his forties.
His first film was the 1981 action drama "Thief," directed by Michael Mann, whom he had met through a mutual friend while still working for the Chicago Police Department.
"I remember going to the set that day and being intrigued by the whole thing," Farina recalled in a 2004 interview with The Associated Press. "I liked it. And everybody was extremely nice to me. If the people were rude and didn't treat me right, things could have gone the other way."
Farina is survived by three sons, six grandchildren and his longtime partner, Marianne Cahill.

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