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Published: Thursday, July 25, 2013, 11:21 a.m.

Uncle uses CPR to save 5-year-old from drowning

EDMONDS -- For the second time in less than five weeks, bystanders performing CPR have helped save a drowning child in Edmonds.
The latest incident occurred Wednesday evening when a 5-year-old boy was pulled from a condominium pool at 75 Pine St. The child was unconscious.
His uncle got him out and did CPR, said Leslie Hynes, a spokeswoman for Snohomish County Fire District 1, which covers Edmonds.
"It wasn't real crowded at the pool," Hynes said. "A family member pulled the child out of the pool and initiated CPR."
Paramedics took over when they arrived. The 911 call was made around 5:50 p.m.
The boy was taken by ambulance to Harborview Medical Center in Seattle.
His condition improved en route.
"He was even talking with the medics when they arrived at the hospital," Hynes said.
In June, a 3-year-old girl was rushed to a hospital after being pulled from a pool in the 10700 block of 226th Street SW.
Emergency dispatchers were told that an unconscious child had been pulled from a pool.
In that case, it wasn't clear how long the child had been in the water, Hynes said.
The girl wasn't breathing and efforts to save her life were under way when paramedics arrived.
The child was breathing again by the time she was taken to Harborview.
"In both cases, we had CPR initiated real quickly with good results," Hynes said.
Safe Kids Snohomish County offers several tips to parents and guardians when children are in or near the water.
It says adults should keep their eyes on their children the entire time they are in the water. The safety advocacy group also recommends staying within arm's length, particularly in deep water.
They also should be aware of how tiring swimming and water-related activities can be. It's easy not to recognize or misjudge fatigue.
Eric Stevick: 425-339-3446, stevick@heraldnet.com
Story tags » EdmondsAccidents (general)

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