The Herald of Everett, Washington
HeraldNet on Facebook HeraldNet on Twitter HeraldNet RSS feeds HeraldNet Pinterest HeraldNet Google Plus HeraldNet Youtube
HeraldNet Newsletters  Newsletters: Sign up | Manage  Green editions icon Green editions

Calendar


HeraldNet Headlines
HeraldNet Newsletter Delivered to your inbox each week.
Published: Friday, December 13, 2013, 9:21 a.m.

Massive boulders hit Utah house, killing 2

  • Flood lights from fire engines parked on nearby State Route 9 shine on the rubble of a two-story log home that was crushed by boulders that broke loos...

    Associated Press

    Flood lights from fire engines parked on nearby State Route 9 shine on the rubble of a two-story log home that was crushed by boulders that broke loose from the cliff above it and killed two people inside the home Thursday in Rockville, Utah.

ROCKVILLE, Utah -- Two people were killed after boulders the size of cars and small houses hurtled into their two-story home in southern Utah.
At least a half-dozen large rocks fell from a cliff behind the house in Rockville Thursday evening, crushing it and a garage, authorities said.
Springdale Police Chief Kurt Wright said two people were found after a search of the house. Their names haven't been released, but Wright described them as a middle-aged couple well-known in the community.
"It's been tough to see the people show up and crumble into tears. It's been hard for the whole canyon," he told KSL-TV.
Wright said the site was "unstable" and added that crews would assess the situation Friday to determine how to recover the bodies.
The police chief said snow and ice had built up on the cliff and between boulders.
Rockville, which is about 5 miles from Zion National Park, is a common site for rock slides, especially in wet weather.
"We typically do tend to see more rock falls during high precipitation events, rain or snow," Tyler Knudson, of the Utah Geological Survey, told KSL. "The snow melts, gets in joints in the rocks. When it freezes it expands and can trigger rock falls. It is more common in the winter, fall and spring."

Share your comments: Log in using your HeraldNet account or your Facebook, Twitter or Disqus profile. Comments that violate the rules are subject to removal. Please see our terms of use. Please note that you must verify your email address for your comments to appear.

You are logged in using your HeraldNet ID. Click here to update your profile. | Log out.

Our new comment system is not supported in IE 7. Please upgrade your browser here.

comments powered by Disqus
digital subscription promo

Subscribe now

Unlimited digital access starting at 99 cents, or included with any print subscription.

HeraldNet highlights

An easy fishing fix
An easy fishing fix: I-90 offers quick access to gorgeous fish, novice-friendly streams
Capturing the past
Capturing the past: Photos bring 19th-century Snohomish architect's work to light
Cherished chair returned
Cherished chair returned: Woman reunited with memento of her husband stolen in 2010
'Fury' is brutal
'Fury' is brutal: Film makes sure the audience knows war is hell
SnoCoSocial