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Published: Monday, December 30, 2013, 12:01 a.m.

Islamic group plans to build mosque in Mukilteo

An Islamic group has bought property and is raising money to build the worship center, which would join mosques in Lynnwood and Mountlake Terrace.

  • An artist's drawing shows what a proposed Islamic center in Mukilteo would look like.

    Submitted image

    An artist's drawing shows what a proposed Islamic center in Mukilteo would look like.

MUKILTEO -- Followers of Islam in Snohomish County could have a new place to worship in the years to come.
Muslims who attend services in rented space on Everett Mall Way recently bought land in Mukilteo with plans to build a mosque on the property.
The Islamic Center of Mukilteo would be only the third mosque in the county, according to the group. The others are Masjud Umar al-Farooq in Mountlake Terrace and Dar-al-arqam Islamic Centre in Lynnwood.
The property is located on Harbour Pointe Boulevard SW just off the Mukilteo Speedway, next to Bank of America and near Mukilteo City Hall.
A group, also called the Islamic Center of Mukilteo, was formed to manage the endeavor. About 10 members met on Saturday in the parking lot next to the parcel for a tailgate lunch to celebrate the launching of the project.
"They are excited about it," said Faisal Sheikh of Snohomish, a member of the group.
The mosque would draw 200 to 400 people for worship, member Zeb Akbar of Mukilteo said. The primary weekly service would be on Friday afternoons.
The mosques in Lynnwood and Mountlake Terrace draw 600 or more worshippers, Mukilteo group members estimated.
The group bought the Mukilteo property, just under an acre in size, for $245,000, Akbar said. Preliminary plans call for a 4,000-square foot building. It's estimated the mosque would cost $600,000.
The group hasn't raised those funds, Akbar said. Most of the money to buy the property was donated by members of Muslim gatherings around the area.
Akbar said the group plans to approach the project bit-by-bit as funds become available. They'll start by clearing the property and arranging for connections to the sewer system and utilities, he said.
Worship services and other features of the building, including a library and game room, will be open to the public, members said.
Mohammed Riaz Khan of Mukilteo is president of the group. Khan was one of 11 people who filed for a vacant position on the Mukilteo City Council. The new council member is scheduled to be selected Jan. 13.
Khan and other members said they want the mosque to be part of the community.
"Anyone can come," member Naseer Ahmed of Everett said.
Mukilteo mayor-elect Jennifer Gregerson said it will be good to see the vacant land next to the bank put to use.
"I think it's great, we have a diverse community, I think it's exciting," she said.
Bill Sheets: 425-339-3439; bsheets@heraldnet.com.
Learn more
For more information or to donate to the Islamic Center of Mukilteo write Faisal Sheikh at faisal@zatc.com.
Story tags » MukilteoReligions

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