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Everett Public Library staff | libref@everettwa.gov
Published: Thursday, February 6, 2014, 8:00 a.m.

Nostalgia, or, whatever happened to Beany and Cecil?

I don't know if it's a common progression in the first-world aging process, but I seem to have hit the part of life where I crave things from my youth, perhaps to reconnect, perhaps for comfort. In the world of books this translates into re-reading favorites, something I've seldom done in the past as I'm always seeking out new treasures. Perchance I'm searching for old friends to see if our relationships have changed. Whatever the reason, I'm firmly entrenched in a tour of previously-read books.

So here's a bit of what I've been up to.

The Old Fox Deceiv'd by Martha Grimes I think the first mysteries I read were by Agatha Christie and Ngaio Marsh, but the first series I really connected with was the Richard Jury mysteries by Martha Grimes. I discovered these books about 25 years ago, and since then I've read every Jury title (with a new one due out this June!). The Old Fox Deceiv'd is the second in the series and contains the many elements that I so enjoyed when first encountering Grimes' writing. Early Jury books often focus on the characters from a small town that Jury's sometime amateur assistant, Melrose Plant, calls home. These people and their goings-on are at least as interesting as the mysteries themselves. As the series has progressed, the bit players have appeared less and the focus of the mysteries has turned much darker. I still love the books, but I do miss my "friends" from the earlier stories. Anyone who enjoys British cozy mysteries (even though Grimes is from Baltimore) should check out Richard Jury.

Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency by Douglas Adams On the heels of the fabulous Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy series, Adams introduced a strange detective, Dirk Gently, who appeared in two books. Not as uproariously funny as Hitchhiker's Guide, these books are still quirky, dry and hilarious.

The BBC recently produced a short series based on the character of Dirk Gently, and this inspired me to re-examine the books. I'm not too far into this one yet, but what I have discovered so far is a profound lack of Dirk Gently; it's taking a while for him to find his way into the story. Whereas Hitchhiker's Guide is a knee-slap-a-minute, Dirk Gently is a much more, well, gentle and abstract humor. One has to work a bit harder to get one's money's worth with Dirk.

Ron Goulart, a writer not widely known, is perhaps one of the most prolific American authors of recent times. I discovered his quirky, humorous sci-fi in high school, and went on to read every title of his I could find. Recently Calling Dr. Patchwork (the first of his books I ever purchased) found its way onto my Kindle. Sadly, I'm not as taken with Goulart's unique style as I once was, but I am enjoying analyzing his writing techniques (for example, conversations where every single sentence is interrupted by the other participant) to discover tricks I can borrow. While EPL does not have any of his entertaining pulp novels, we do carry books from the TekWar series which were credited to William Shatner but are quite obviously penned by Goulart.

My nostalgia has manifested in many other ways, leading me to watch old movies such as Rear Window, Star Wars: Episode IV, A New Hope and That Touch of Mink. Or to delve into finales and conclusions of TV shows such as The Office and The Mentalist. Pulp readings from young-adult years revisit me, including works of John D. MacDonald and Robert Sheckley. It's a strange phenomenon, and I'm not enjoying everything of old as much as I once did, but overall the experience is positive.

I'm not sure what the next step or phase of life will be, but I do know that I'm not ready for pants that go halfway up my chest.

Yet.

Be sure to visit A Reading Life for more reviews and news of all things happening at the Everett Public Library.

Story tags » Books

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