HeraldNet Ticket Giveaway

Fill out my online form.
The Herald of Everett, Washington
HeraldNet on Facebook HeraldNet on Twitter HeraldNet RSS feeds HeraldNet Pinterest HeraldNet Google Plus HeraldNet Youtube
HeraldNet Newsletters  Newsletters: Sign up | Manage  Green editions icon Green editions

Calendar

Splash! Summer guide

Sports headlines
HeraldNet Newsletter Delivered to your inbox each week.
Published: Friday, April 11, 2014, 12:26 p.m.

Former NBA All-Star Lou Hudson dies at 69

  • This photo from 1966 shows shows University of Minnesota basketball player Lou Hudson. Hudson, who went on to become a six-time NBA All-Star, died Fri...

    Associated Press

    This photo from 1966 shows shows University of Minnesota basketball player Lou Hudson. Hudson, who went on to become a six-time NBA All-Star, died Friday in Atlanta, the Atlanta Hawks said. He was 69.

ATLANTA — Lou Hudson, a smooth-shooting star for the Hawks who averaged more than 20 points during 13 NBA seasons, died Friday. He was 69.
He died in Atlanta, where he was hospitalized and listed in grave condition last month after a stroke, the Hawks said.
Hudson, a six-time All-Star nicknamed “Sweet Lou,” played for the Hawks in St. Louis and Atlanta. The guard-forward averaged 20.2 points for his career. He spent 11 seasons with the Hawks and finished with the Los Angeles Lakers in 1979.
His No. 23 was retired by the Hawks, joining Bob Pettit and Dominique Wilkins as the only other Hawks players so honored. His No. 14 was retired by the University of Minnesota, where he was one of the school’s first black players.
“Lou Hudson holds a special place in the Hawks family, in the hearts of our fans and in the history of our club,” Hawks co-owner Michael Gearon said. “As a fan growing up with this team, I’m fortunate to say I was able to see almost every game Sweet Lou played as a member of the Hawks.
“He was an integral part of successful Hawks teams for over a decade, and is deservedly recognized with the ultimate symbol of his significance to the franchise with the number 23 hanging inside Philips Arena.”
Beginning with the 1969-70 season, Hudson averaged at least 24 points in five straight seasons. In his years with the Hawks, he averaged at least 20 points seven times. He set a career high with his average of 27.1 points per game in the 1972-73 season.
He scored 57 points against Chicago on Nov. 10, 1969, matching the franchise record also set by Pettit and Wilkins.
Hudson was a first-round pick by St. Louis in 1966 and made the NBA all-rookie team. He missed part of his second season while serving in the Army.
Following the team’s move from St. Louis, he scored the first points for the new Atlanta team in 1968. He helped lead the Hawks to the 1970 Western Division championship.
Hudson, a native of Greensboro, N.C., is also a member of the North Carolina, Georgia and Atlanta sports hall of fame. He was drafted by the Dallas Cowboys in 1966 even though he didn’t play college football.
Hudson suffered his first stroke in 2005 and later campaigned for the “Power to End Stroke” organization.
Story tags » NBA

Share your comments: Log in using your HeraldNet account or your Facebook, Twitter or Disqus profile. Comments that violate the rules are subject to removal. Please see our terms of use. Please note that you must verify your email address for your comments to appear.

You are logged in using your HeraldNet ID. Click here to update your profile. | Log out.

Our new comment system is not supported in IE 7. Please upgrade your browser here.

comments powered by Disqus
digital subscription promo

Subscribe now

Unlimited digital access starting at 99 cents, or included with any print subscription.



HeraldNet highlights

Starting nine
Starting nine: Tasting beers under the sun at the Everett Craft Beer Fest
Looking for a friend?
Looking for a friend?: Animals up for adoption at the Everett shelter (new photos)
Change of focus
Change of focus: Photography gives retired deputy a new purpose
Growing pains
Growing pains: Lake Stevens makes plans to cope with rapid expansion