The Herald of Everett, Washington
HeraldNet on Facebook HeraldNet on Twitter HeraldNet RSS feeds HeraldNet Pinterest HeraldNet Google Plus HeraldNet Youtube
HeraldNet Newsletters  Newsletters: Sign up | Manage  Green editions icon Green editions

Calendar


Weekend to-do list
HeraldNet Newsletter Delivered to your inbox each week.
Published: Thursday, April 24, 2014, 12:01 a.m.

Book takes a peek at coolest birdhouses

  • Anne Schmauss, author and co-owner of the store Wild Birds Unlimited in Santa Fe, N.M., says she has sold thousands of birdhouses and has seen firstha...

    Los Angeles Times

    Anne Schmauss, author and co-owner of the store Wild Birds Unlimited in Santa Fe, N.M., says she has sold thousands of birdhouses and has seen firsthand the fascination they hold. For her new book, “Birdhouses of the World” (Stewart, Tabori & Chang, $22.50), Schmauss searched the world to showcase the “coolest” birdhouses and tell their stories.

Certain objects have been a perennial source of inspiration to artists, artisans and designers.
Think of the teapot, a simple vessel both functional and ornamental that has been endlessly reimagined over the centuries. Or the chair in its many permutations.
The birdhouse is another object that has inspired flights of fancy. Anne Schmauss, author and co-owner of the store Wild Birds Unlimited in Santa Fe, N.M., says she has sold thousands of birdhouses and has seen firsthand the fascination they hold.
For her new book, “Birdhouses of the World” ($22.50), Schmauss searched the world to showcase the “coolest” birdhouses and tell their stories.
And what fantastic birdhouses she has found, some habitable and others purely decorative.
Her book leads off with Thomas Burke’s massive Skywalker Ranch birdhouse, a replica of George Lucas’ Skywalker Ranch that was installed on Lucas’ Marin County property in 2011.
The 600-pound home, suitable for sparrows and European starlings, was made from recycled and reused materials and is the size of a small car.
A simpler birdhouse, the Ralph, nods to Modernist architect Ralph Rapson’s iconic 1945 Greenbelt House, one of the early Case Study houses.
The handcrafted house with angled rooflines is made of sustainably harvested wood and built with birds in mind.
And then there’s Anthony Cateaux’s the Scream birdhouse, fashioned of welded metal and inspired by the Edvard Munch painting. Does this one attract birds or scare them away?
David Bruce’s more whimsical Weathered Wonders birdhouses incorporate reclaimed wood and old and new hardware.

Share your comments: Log in using your HeraldNet account or your Facebook, Twitter or Disqus profile. Comments that violate the rules are subject to removal. Please see our terms of use. Please note that you must verify your email address for your comments to appear.

You are logged in using your HeraldNet ID. Click here to update your profile. | Log out.

Our new comment system is not supported in IE 7. Please upgrade your browser here.

comments powered by Disqus
digital subscription promo

Subscribe now

Unlimited digital access starting at 99 cents, or included with any print subscription.

loading...

HeraldNet highlights

Richard Sherman 2.0
Richard Sherman 2.0: Seahawks' star cornerback is equally effective with less bravado
Playing with all they have
Playing with all they have: Highland Christian girls compete, inspire with just 5 players
Wolf population growing
Wolf population growing: Chief concern about more wolves: Livestock attacks
$800K in scholarships, so far
$800K in scholarships, so far: Monroe High's Chloe Cook expects she’ll still need a job
SnoCoSocial