The Herald of Everett, Washington
HeraldNet on Facebook HeraldNet on Twitter HeraldNet RSS feeds HeraldNet Pinterest HeraldNet Google Plus HeraldNet Youtube
HeraldNet Newsletters  Newsletters: Sign up | Manage  Green editions icon Green editions

Calendar


HeraldNet Headlines
HeraldNet Newsletter Delivered to your inbox each week.
Published: Saturday, August 16, 2014, 12:01 a.m.

Monroe steam stack will be decoratively painted

MONROE — The steam stack at the old Carnation milk condensery on U.S. 2 is set to get a new look.
The Monroe Chamber of Commerce held an election to choose one of four images to be painted onto the 150-foot tower. They decided on a scene that includes Mount Index, the Skykomish River and evergreen trees.
Una Wirkebau-Hartt said she wondered why the steamstack wasn't painted when she took a the job as the chamber's executive director earlier this year. She reached out to the Monroe Historical Society for help narrowing down the designs put to the vote. She envisioned the steam stack showcasing the city's past.
“The point is to start conversations and get people talking about Monroe,” Wirkebau-Hartt said.
Monroe's Carnation plant burned down in the 1940s. The city's steam stack and one other are the last standing remnants of the milk company in Washington, she continued.
Carnation's steam stack in Mount Vernon has also been painted. Wirkebau-Hartt has enlisted the same painter, Jose Cardona, of Mount Vernon, to do the work in Monroe. Artist Ester McLatchy, also of Mount Vernon, is lined up to convert the image from paper to the steam stack.
“That's not a skill everyone has,” Wirkebau-Hartt said.
Wirkebau-Hartt has been reviewing the condensery's local history with records from 1908 to 1921. Wirkebau-Hartt also contacted the plant owner's great-great-great grandson. He is planning to come to the ribbon cutting for the newly painted steam stack. That event is expected to take place at the end of September.
The steam stack is set to be power-washed before painting begins, probably the second week of September.
In the future, Wirkebau-Hartt hopes to have historic photos and information about the history of the stack, the carnation plant and Monroe.
Amy Nile: 425-339-3192; anile@heraldnet.com. Twitter: @AmyNileReports.
Story tags » PaintingHistorical SitesMonroeSnohomish County history

Share your comments: Log in using your HeraldNet account or your Facebook, Twitter or Disqus profile. Comments that violate the rules are subject to removal. Please see our terms of use. Please note that you must verify your email address for your comments to appear.

You are logged in using your HeraldNet ID. Click here to update your profile. | Log out.

Our new comment system is not supported in IE 7. Please upgrade your browser here.

comments powered by Disqus

HeraldNet highlights

Prep football roundup
Prep football roundup: Photos and stories from week 4 of the high school season
This dog has 9 lives
This dog has 9 lives: A Terrace couple is overjoyed Daisy Mae survived fire
Rising to the top
Rising to the top: Melissa Benton is the new head of Quantum Windows
'Colton's Army'
'Colton's Army': Bothell teen rallies his recruits to fight leukemia